Writing more better

15 Feb

One of the reasons that some people choose not to contribute to their company blog is their concern that their grammar is not up to snuff.

If you fall into this camp, here are a few links that might help you:

Purdue Online Writing Lab

Thesaurus.com

Synonym.com

Future-perfect (ok – these are folks that will check it for you, but they also have some great links so you can help yourself)

One of the beautiful things about a blog – you are probably the harshest critic about your own grammar (unless, of course, your blog is about grammar.  Then everyone that reads it will be focused on finding, and pointing out, every little mistake you have made.  I highly recommend that you do not write a grammar blog – unless you are open to incessant critiquing).

That being said, focus on what you want to say, not how you want to say it. The secret to a successful blog is to be interesting, not to be grammatically correct. (Just out of curiosity, how many mistakes did you find in this post 🙂

@brandscaping

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5 Responses to “Writing more better”

  1. dougbrowncreative February 15, 2010 at 3:00 pm #

    I suggest you run a spell check J.

  2. jasonfinnerty February 15, 2010 at 3:04 pm #

    Really – i figured using “their” 3 times in the first sentence would be the first error…

  3. Janice February 15, 2010 at 3:12 pm #

    Ain’t it the truth! The first responders to my blog posts are often the grammer police – I have learned to love um because they make me look quite brilliant. And kick myself every time for that little typo that got away.

  4. kchap February 16, 2010 at 10:32 am #

    Good call on writing what needs to be said, and not writing what needs to be read. You’ve got some great resources up there, but I find nothing beats having the trusty dictionary close at hand (or online). It’s amazing how many times I’ll double check the use of a word, and be glad I did! Thanks for the resources.

  5. jasonfinnerty February 16, 2010 at 10:37 am #

    Hey Kevin – absolutely right.

    i find i’m checking dictionary.com quite often to find the correct usage of words:

    complimentary/complementary
    dependent/dependant
    affect/effect
    affluent/effluent

    ok – the last one is a bit crappy – but you made a great point!

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