How to avoid social media burnout

15 Aug

Copeland currently has pages on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and YouTube. We have this blog, and many of us our migrating into Google+ in anticipation of the Facebook-like appearance of media opportunities there…and because it isn’t half bad.

This doesn’t even mention the amount of time we take reading articles and blogs, curating content, sharing findings internally, summifying (is it too soon for that to be a verb?), leaving comments and responding to those aimed at us.

A certain level of addiction has to settle in if you’re going to use social media wisely, consistency being a key to success.

But like drug users, we end up doing social media because we have to. It’s the perfect scenario for burnout, because it’s a bottomless maw. You can feed it until your arms drop off and there will be so much more you could have done if only…

Russel Lolacher and Yukari Peerless asked me on their YouTube show Getting Engaged (their 1-year anniversary show by the way – good on ya both!) and we discussed social media burnout.

Yeah that’s me in party hat, laugh it up. The part where we discuss burnout kicks in at about 4:30.

I’d like to suggest some other ways to stay in control and interested:

Set parameters. Do you think Google+ is going to be the last Next Big Thing? Of course it isn’t. They will continue to be pooped out with annoying, and occasionally interesting, regularity. Pick your fields, establish your time commitment and work them. When time’s up, put your mobile down, stop typing or stop reading. You have a life to live.

Spread the time investment. Make one day all about sourcing content, the next about investigating new platforms that could help your business, the next about creating new content, and the one after that about promoting it. Don’t try to do it all at once every day. Better yet, if you have multiple participants within your organization, assign a different task exclusively to each that plays to their strengths. One might be a better researcher, another a better writer.

Pace yourself. Social media will suck up every second of your life if you let it. Pick your spots during the day and stick to them. I post to the blog before 6 am, check Twitter and Google+ until 6:30, roll onto Twitter again at lunch hour and just before work closes. Monday evening is when I read about new developments and ways people are using social media successfully. My other evenings are for my life.

Take a break.  What do you think would happen if you stopped tweeting for a week? The sky would fall down? Or worse: your Klout score! Tough T’s. You won’t be remembered for your Klout score when you’ve moved onto the great marshmallow kingdom in the sky. Let it go for a week and focus on something more traditional and healthy. Like yourself, or your kids or your colleagues. Or your clients.

It will be there when you come back. And you’ll be ready for it again.

Advertisements

5 Responses to “How to avoid social media burnout”

  1. Dan Parks August 15, 2011 at 11:09 am #

    Excellent show! Well done all.

  2. Russel Lolacher (@RussLoL) August 15, 2011 at 11:30 am #

    Thanks Dan. Can’t believe it’s been a year already.

  3. Doug Brown August 15, 2011 at 11:51 am #

    Thanks Dan. Can’t believe Russel brought those hats.

  4. barry hill, copywriter August 16, 2011 at 6:10 pm #

    I came. I viewed. I clicked.
    That’s my way of encouraging you all. (Only knew Doug before, but now will check out a vid or 2 of ‘engaged’.) Keep the faith you burnouts!

  5. Doug Brown August 16, 2011 at 7:21 pm #

    Good on ya Baz. Thanks for stopping by and checking out the vids by these good socmed peeps!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s